Wagon Wheel Weaving

$50.00

Wagon Wheel Weaving

Wagon Wheel rugs are made on a variety of round frames. The popular name has led some people to believe that they were woven on the actual wooden wagon wheel. Instead, the name refers to the “spokes” that show in the round design. Originating in the Scandanavian countries, wagon wheel rugs appeared in North America in the 1800s. These rugs are most often woven of heavier fabrics (wool, flannel, etc) so that the tension on the weaving “spokes” does not become overwhelming.

For this class we will be using a 12” ring and fabric to learn the technique. All supplies furnished. You will go home with the ring, sample, and instructions to make any size rug.

Appropriate for all levels

Instructor Jonee Davis has been active in the fiber arts for a many years. She first learned to weave then took up spinning. She is also an avid crocheter while dabbling in all the other aspects relating to fibers. She feels that we are never too young or too old learn new things about the world of fiber arts and loves to share whatever knowledge she has with others. Jonee has a small hobby farm where she and her husband are the caretakers of boer goats, horses, alpacas, sheep, LGD’s, and all the other livestock that come with a farm.

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Description

Wagon Wheel Weaving

Wagon Wheel rugs are made on a variety of round frames. The popular name has led some people to believe that they were woven on the actual wooden wagon wheel. Instead, the name refers to the “spokes” that show in the round design. Originating in the Scandanavian countries, wagon wheel rugs appeared in North America in the 1800s. These rugs are most often woven of heavier fabrics (wool, flannel, etc) so that the tension on the weaving “spokes” does not become overwhelming.

For this class we will be using a 12” ring and fabric to learn the technique. All supplies furnished. You will go home with the ring, sample, and instructions to make any size rug.

Appropriate for all levels

Instructor Jonee Davis has been active in the fiber arts for a many years. She first learned to weave then took up spinning. She is also an avid crocheter while dabbling in all the other aspects relating to fibers. She feels that we are never too young or too old learn new things about the world of fiber arts and loves to share whatever knowledge she has with others. Jonee has a small hobby farm where she and her husband are the caretakers of boer goats, horses, alpacas, sheep, LGD’s, and all the other livestock that come with a farm.

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